Dafni Straightening Ceramic Brush
Dafni Straightening Ceramic Brush

I’ve been using the Dafni Straightening Ceramic Brush for a few days now – I wanted to get to know it properly before posting although I did touch on this when I saw it at a press day a while back.  As you can see, it’s a brush with central ceramic ‘bristles’ which is where the heat comes from.

There are a few things you need to know, because as soon as the Dafni Straightening Ceramic Brush gets going on PR, it’s going to be everywhere and I imagine, a complete sell out. First of all, if you have fine and thin hair, it’s not suitable for you. The technology relies on being able to grip into your hair for a bit of ‘pull’ so if your hair is fine and thin, it’s not going to be nearly as effective. I also don’t think it’s the right thing for short hair either because the precision of the gadget isn’t there. However, if you have thick and unruly long-ish hair it really works! Tie your hair up in sections if you have long hair and start from the underhair to the outerhair (have I just made up some words?!).

Dafni Straightening Ceramic Brush
Dafni Straightening Ceramic Brush

I’ve found that it works best post wash or when hair is on the right side of the wash – and it does take out the kinks and frizz. The actual mechanics of using it take a bit of getting used to – don’t, under any circumstances touch the head of the brush while you’re styling because it’s really, really hot. Because it’s a brush though, and not a straightener, your brain thinks it’s ok to touch as you would any styling brush. Don’t be like me and do this – I have a sore thumb to vouch for this! So, you need to get used to the motion.

The advantage over straighteners is that it brushes your hair at the same time (but has nowhere near the ‘bristle’ denisty that a regular brush does), although if you are super knotty, you will benefit by brushing out first. I’ve been getting out of bed in the morning and instead of brushing and then passing the straighteners over my hair (or, I often just do a dry blow dry on it to neaten it out) I’ve used the Dafni instead. It’s a bit tomaytos/tomahtos as to whether you’ll love it more than straighteners; I’m in the swing of it now (my daughter has tried it too – her comment (fine hair but a lot of it) was that it’s going to completely change her mornings) and find it easy to use everywhere other than my fringe. At £140 HERE I think you need to know the pros and cons.

Co-founder, Sharon Rabi demonstrates the Dafni HERE and if your hair is like hers, you will get the same results that she does.

*all products are sent to me as samples from brands and agencies unless otherwise stated